Tiaras

Battle of the Tiaras – It’s a Fringe Off!!!

The inspiration for the last few Defense of the Tiaras was the Sweden / South Korea State Dinner, held on June 14th. While Queen Silvia was radiant in the Leuchtenberg Sapphire Tiara, it was the tiaras of her daughters, and daughter-in-law, that prompted this series.

This week we are putting the fringe / fringe-adjacent tiaras of the Swedish princesses up against each other.

The Baden Fringe Tiara

See the history, discussion and vote totals here.

The Modern Fringe Tiara

See the history, discussion and vote totals here.

Princess Sofia’s Tiara

See the history, discussion and vote totals here.

So there it is…which royal tiara wins your heart?

Which of these fringes is your fave?
Sweden

Random Royaling – Birthday Edition

Sunday was Crown Princess Victoria’s 42nd birthday. To celebrate the family followed tradition and started the morning at Solliden.

Later in the day they attended Victoria’s birthday concert.

Queen Silvia and Crown Princess Victoria wore traditional dress for this event, as per usual.

Prince Carl Philip, Princess Sofia, Princess Madeleine and Chris O’Neill were all in attendance at the concert.

Embed from Getty Images

Embed from Getty Images

Not to worry…Bits and Bobs will return tomorrow!

Tiaras

In Defense of the Tiara – Sofia’s Wedding Tiara

This week we’re talking about the newest addition to the Swedish vaults – Princess Sofia’s Wedding Tiara.

I hear you…it’s not technically a fringe, but definitely fringe adjacent.

The History

Sofia Hellqvist received this tiara from her future in-laws on the occasion of her marriage to Prince Carl Philip of Sweden on June 13, 2015. It was reported that the tiara was originally a necklace which was a gift for Queen Silvia from a Thai prince. Sils sent the necklace to a Thai jeweler to be transformed into a tiara for her future daughter-in-law.

The tiara is a series of graduated palmette motifs, originally topped with pear shaped emeralds. Sofia, true to her new family’s jewel loving roots, she has been re-configuring her tiara since she received it. The first step was opening the base, so it sat more comfortably on her head. Then she removed the emeralds and wore the tiara without toppers, and then replaced the emeralds with pearls.

The Case for the Tiara

LiL: I’m going to jump in here with a like. I wasn’t sold on it at her wedding, or for it’s first appearance or two after, but since the adjustments? *chef’s kiss* I think it’s perfect for her. It also helps knowing that Sils spreads the tiara love, so she isn’t saddled with it for life, unlike poor Marie over there in Denmark appears to be with hers. I wonder if we’ll see any of the other princesses take it for a spin?

OC: I’m in the definitely not a fringe camp. Regardless, I don’t mind this tiara one bit, especially when it’s more fanned out. The pearls are my preferred version.

LG: I’m with LIL and OC on this one. The original was ok, but the way it perched on Sofia’s head was not great; I actually kept hoping it wouldn’t fall off during the wedding! The redesign though…right up my tiara loving alley. The more open design fits her much better, and being able to switch out the jewels on top, always a win!

The Handbag: I probably should work up an against comment since I am the last one in. I just…can’t. I don’t know if it’s the charm of its owner, or the message sent by her in laws with the gift, or the versatility of the piece itself, but I quite like it. Of course, it’s no wall. But it’s a pretty thing.

The Case against the Tiara

Well…

How do you feel about Sofia's Tiara?
Tiaras

In Defense of the Tiara – The Modern Fringe Tiara

Back to Sweden this week, with our featured tiara being one of the favorites of Princess Madeleine – The Modern Fringe Tiara.

Maddie is anxiously awaiting your thoughts.

The History

There’s no real history known for this one, only that Queen Silvia of Sweden began wearing it in the late 1980s. That led many to believe that it was a 10th anniversary present from King Carl Gustaf in 1986 (nicely done if so). It is usually referred to as a “private tiara,” and has actually been gifted to Maddie by her parents.

What we do know: this one is a modern take on the classic fringe, the accent diamonds that flare off the main fringe almost seem to interlock around the smaller pieces between each fringe. Added to that you’ve got some round diamonds on top of the fringes and down below on the base. This one is also a tiara/necklace convertible, and one of the few that actually makes that change quite often.

The Case for the Tiara

LG: The design is delicate, but diamond heavy. I like the similarities in the design between the larger and smaller fringe elements, as well as the diamond toppers on the larger fringes. And surprisingly for a tiara/necklace combo, this one looks good as a necklace as well.

LiL: I love it. I really do. One of my very favorite Swedish tiaras. And on Maddie? Perfection.

OC: I am here for this piece. Simply put? She’s pretty.

The Case against the Tiara

The Handbag: You know what I am going to say, right? It’s fine for a fringe that isn’t a WALL OF DIAMONDS THAT YOU WEAR ON YOUR HEAD. Actually, this isn’t a “case against” at all. Maddie looks very pretty in that photo, and the delicacy of this one is actually more pleasing to me than the Baden.

What do you think of the Modern Fringe?
Tiaras

In Defense of the Tiara – The Baden Fringe

Ok, it’s that time. I’ve taken on some of your favorite tiaras in this series (sorry, still don’t like the Girls…). It’s time to put my all time fave on the line – The Baden Fringe Tiara.

You knew I’d pick a photo with Big Red.

The History

This tiara traveled to Sweden in 1881 with the first Princess Victoria, a wedding present from her parents, Grand Duke Friedrich I and Grand Duchess Louise of Baden. Victoria married Crown Prince Gustaf on September 20 in Karlsruhe. The tiara is made up of 47 diamond rays, with smaller spikes in between the larger rays. As with most fringes, it is also designed to be worn as a necklace, which Victoria of Baden did on her wedding day, but the current Swedish ladies have kept it in tiara form.

The Case for the Tiara

LG: To me this is perfection. The diamond design of the fringes to look like rays of sunlight, to the smaller spikes in between filling up the negative space at the bottom of the diamond. The difference in height between the front and the back makes it fun for the Swedish hairdressers (who are amazing) to play with, and just how far it wraps around the head. It’s the first thing I think of when someone says “tiara.”

LiL: I’m going to hop on here with you, even though it’s not my favorite fringe tiara by a long shot. I said the other day that I like my fringes to be just this side of lethal, and this one has always reminded me of the faces drawn onto the airplanes during WWII. You know, with the teeth? All lethal looking? No?

The Handbag: It’s perfectly fine for a fringe that isn’t a WALL OF DIAMONDS THAT YOU WEAR ON YOUR HEAD.

The Case against the Tiara

OC: It’s too solid. It’s too angular. Nope. I can’t even pretend to like this tiara. I love it.

How do you feel about the Baden Fringe Tiara?

What do you guys think?

If you like Swedish fringes, stick around. We’ve got something fun coming up…